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    December 20, 2019
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LOOKING OUT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS. KEEPING SAFE AT CHRISTMAS Christmas should be a time for fun and happiness, but we know it also comes with a lot of expense and pressure. This can increase the risk of Family Violence. t's up to al of us to look out for the signs and to help where we can. How can you help family and friends if you suspect something isn't right? Community Champions in the it's Not OK - Viclence Free Wahi campaign received family violence training from Hauraki Family Violence Intervention Network taking on their role. but anyone in the community can offer support, all it takes is a few simple steps. Take a stand: let people know that you are against Family Violence, and that you're there to help anyone who wants help. Being open, available and non-judgemental wil hep those close to you feel that they can tak to you. Knowing the signs of an unheathy relationship is also useful; victims of abuse may not always display obvious' signs such as physical injuries or expressing fear. Some of the more subtle signs you could look out for include: appearing to walk on eggshells' around a person, suddenly becoming withdrawn, becoming isolated from family or thiends, appeaning anxious or worrying about their partner's reaction. If you see these signs, the first step to helping can just be to ask - are you ok? Try not to tell them what to do especialy that you think they should just leave their partner'. LOirWHANASAE WITH THERES PIREECNVIOEENDE GROWINGI Remember that people using and experiencing violence are often ashamed, so they may not speak to you straight away but by keeping in touch and leaving the door open you never know when you could be the one to make the difference. IT IS someone discloses violence to you, your reaction matters. You don't have to be their counselor or social worker; just stay calm listen, let them know that you are there to help and that the violence is not their fault. You could also choose to prepare yourself by getting to know what family violence support services are avalable locally, or get odvice from the it's Not OK Campaign. It could be some time, but you can offer them this information when they are ready to make a change. Esomeone you know is in immediate danger always dial 111. you know someone wanting to make the change to become violence free, support them by finding out about local support options. You can call the Family Violence Information Line on 0800 456 450 or contact us at lauren@hfvin.co.nz or catch up with one of the campaign champions in person or on our facebook page. It is OK to ask for help TO ASK OKFOR HELP |0800 456 450 |www.areyouok.org.nz Hauraki Family Violence Intervention Network (HFVIN) is a collective of around 100 individuals representing over 60 organisations from across the Thames-Coromandel and Hauraki Regions. We believe in supporting positive connections between people and strengthening healthy relationships and families. We do this by sharing key messages, holding conversations, sharing resources and by providing training. VIOLENCE FREE LOOKING OUT FOR FAMILY AND FRIENDS. KEEPING SAFE AT CHRISTMAS Christmas should be a time for fun and happiness, but we know it also comes with a lot of expense and pressure. This can increase the risk of Family Violence. t's up to al of us to look out for the signs and to help where we can. How can you help family and friends if you suspect something isn't right? Community Champions in the it's Not OK - Viclence Free Wahi campaign received family violence training from Hauraki Family Violence Intervention Network taking on their role. but anyone in the community can offer support, all it takes is a few simple steps. Take a stand: let people know that you are against Family Violence, and that you're there to help anyone who wants help. Being open, available and non-judgemental wil hep those close to you feel that they can tak to you. Knowing the signs of an unheathy relationship is also useful; victims of abuse may not always display obvious' signs such as physical injuries or expressing fear. Some of the more subtle signs you could look out for include: appearing to walk on eggshells' around a person, suddenly becoming withdrawn, becoming isolated from family or thiends, appeaning anxious or worrying about their partner's reaction. If you see these signs, the first step to helping can just be to ask - are you ok? Try not to tell them what to do especialy that you think they should just leave their partner'. LOirWHANASAE WITH THERES PIREECNVIOEENDE GROWINGI Remember that people using and experiencing violence are often ashamed, so they may not speak to you straight away but by keeping in touch and leaving the door open you never know when you could be the one to make the difference. IT IS someone discloses violence to you, your reaction matters. You don't have to be their counselor or social worker; just stay calm listen, let them know that you are there to help and that the violence is not their fault. You could also choose to prepare yourself by getting to know what family violence support services are avalable locally, or get odvice from the it's Not OK Campaign. It could be some time, but you can offer them this information when they are ready to make a change. Esomeone you know is in immediate danger always dial 111. you know someone wanting to make the change to become violence free, support them by finding out about local support options. You can call the Family Violence Information Line on 0800 456 450 or contact us at lauren@hfvin.co.nz or catch up with one of the campaign champions in person or on our facebook page. It is OK to ask for help TO ASK OKFOR HELP |0800 456 450 |www.areyouok.org.nz Hauraki Family Violence Intervention Network (HFVIN) is a collective of around 100 individuals representing over 60 organisations from across the Thames-Coromandel and Hauraki Regions. We believe in supporting positive connections between people and strengthening healthy relationships and families. We do this by sharing key messages, holding conversations, sharing resources and by providing training. VIOLENCE FREE