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    February 28, 2020
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KEEP KIDS SAFE It's not ok for children and young people to witness violence. Research shows that violence in the home affects children whether they see it, hear it or just know about it. Experiencing violence in the home can make it harder for children to learn, to make friends and to be happy and healthy, and the effects of violence can long outlast any visible scars. Children need adults to keep them safe and whether we are parents, family members, friends or neighbours we all have a part to play in this. If you are worried about a child experiencing violence in the home, don't ignore it. Even if you are not directly If a child you know tells you there is violence in the home, the most important thing you can do is listen and believe them. Ask if they feel safe and make sure they know that the violence or anger is not their fault, nor is it their responsibility to stop it. Let them know they can always come and talk to you, but do not promise to keep anything they say a secret. Depending on the age of the child you may be able to talk to them about safe places to go if they are at risk, or teach them how and when to make a 111 call. Quick Tips: How to help. Ask 'Are you ok? Listen and believe, but don't judge and don't promise to keep secrets Offer a safe place for children to go (with parents knowledge and consent) Make sure children know it's not their fault |0800 456 450 Iwww.areyouok.org.nz See if you can offer help to ease the pressure at home VIOLENCE FREE COROMANDeHAU KEEP KIDS SAFE It's not ok for children and young people to witness violence. Research shows that violence in the home affects children whether they see it, hear it or just know about it. Experiencing violence in the home can make it harder for children to learn, to make friends and to be happy and healthy, and the effects of violence can long outlast any visible scars. Children need adults to keep them safe and whether we are parents, family members, friends or neighbours we all have a part to play in this. If you are worried about a child experiencing violence in the home, don't ignore it. Even if you are not directly If a child you know tells you there is violence in the home, the most important thing you can do is listen and believe them. Ask if they feel safe and make sure they know that the violence or anger is not their fault, nor is it their responsibility to stop it. Let them know they can always come and talk to you, but do not promise to keep anything they say a secret. Depending on the age of the child you may be able to talk to them about safe places to go if they are at risk, or teach them how and when to make a 111 call. Quick Tips: How to help. Ask 'Are you ok? Listen and believe, but don't judge and don't promise to keep secrets Offer a safe place for children to go (with parents knowledge and consent) Make sure children know it's not their fault |0800 456 450 Iwww.areyouok.org.nz See if you can offer help to ease the pressure at home VIOLENCE FREE COROMANDeHAU