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    September 11, 2020
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It's not ok for children and young people to witness violence. Research shows that viclence in the home affects children whether they see it, hear it or just know about it (and we're not as good at hiding things from our children as we think). Experiencing violence in the home can make it harder for children to leam, to make friends and to be happy and healthy, and the effects of violence can long outlast any visible scars. YOU HAVE A SPECIAL STRENGTH INSIDE YOUYO I HEAR YOU I BELIEVE YOU Children need adults to keep them safe and whether we are parents, family members, friends or neighbours we all have a part to play in this. IT ISN'T YOUR FAULT A CHILD IS NEVER RESPONSIBLE If you are worried about a child experiencing violence in the home, don't ignore it. Even if you are not directly able to stop the violence, there are things you can do to help. The first step is to start the conversation with the adults in the home. Ask 'Are you ok?" and let them know you care and are concerned without judging them. Perhaps you could help to ease some of the pressure at home by dropping round some fruit or veges from the garden, being available for a cup of tea, or even offering to take the kids for a while. Having a safe and violence free space to go to can make all the difference to a child. Ifa chld you know tells you there is violence in the home, the most important thing you can do is listen and believe them. Ask if they feel safe and make sure they know that the violence or anger is not their fault, nor is it their responsibility to stop it. Let them know they can always come and tak to you, but do not promise to keep anything they say a secret. Depending on the age of the child you may be able to talk to them about safe places to go if they are at risk, or teach them how and when to make a 111 call. Free, confidential and anonymous advice is available from your local social service provider, If you believe a child to be in immediate danger, dial 111. FOR THE ACTIONS OF AN ADULT IT'S NOT YOUR JOB TO STOP IT YOU HAVE HAD TO OVERCOME OBSTACLES THAT OTHER CHILDREN NEVER HAD TO VOUHAVE ASEECIAL STRENGTH NSDE YOU I BELIEVE YOU When you know what to samy, one sentence can make a meaningtul change in a child's life Quick Tips: How to help. Ask "Are you ok? Listen and believe, but don't judge and don't promise to keep secrets Offer a safe place for Children to go (with parents knowledge and consent) Make sure children know it's not their fault FAMILY VIOLENCE areyouok.org.nz 0800 456 450 IT'S NOT OK See if you can offer help to ease the pressure at home It's not ok for children and young people to witness violence. Research shows that viclence in the home affects children whether they see it, hear it or just know about it (and we're not as good at hiding things from our children as we think). Experiencing violence in the home can make it harder for children to leam, to make friends and to be happy and healthy, and the effects of violence can long outlast any visible scars. YOU HAVE A SPECIAL STRENGTH INSIDE YOUYO I HEAR YOU I BELIEVE YOU Children need adults to keep them safe and whether we are parents, family members, friends or neighbours we all have a part to play in this. IT ISN'T YOUR FAULT A CHILD IS NEVER RESPONSIBLE If you are worried about a child experiencing violence in the home, don't ignore it. Even if you are not directly able to stop the violence, there are things you can do to help. The first step is to start the conversation with the adults in the home. Ask 'Are you ok?" and let them know you care and are concerned without judging them. Perhaps you could help to ease some of the pressure at home by dropping round some fruit or veges from the garden, being available for a cup of tea, or even offering to take the kids for a while. Having a safe and violence free space to go to can make all the difference to a child. Ifa chld you know tells you there is violence in the home, the most important thing you can do is listen and believe them. Ask if they feel safe and make sure they know that the violence or anger is not their fault, nor is it their responsibility to stop it. Let them know they can always come and tak to you, but do not promise to keep anything they say a secret. Depending on the age of the child you may be able to talk to them about safe places to go if they are at risk, or teach them how and when to make a 111 call. Free, confidential and anonymous advice is available from your local social service provider, If you believe a child to be in immediate danger, dial 111. FOR THE ACTIONS OF AN ADULT IT'S NOT YOUR JOB TO STOP IT YOU HAVE HAD TO OVERCOME OBSTACLES THAT OTHER CHILDREN NEVER HAD TO VOUHAVE ASEECIAL STRENGTH NSDE YOU I BELIEVE YOU When you know what to samy, one sentence can make a meaningtul change in a child's life Quick Tips: How to help. Ask "Are you ok? Listen and believe, but don't judge and don't promise to keep secrets Offer a safe place for Children to go (with parents knowledge and consent) Make sure children know it's not their fault FAMILY VIOLENCE areyouok.org.nz 0800 456 450 IT'S NOT OK See if you can offer help to ease the pressure at home